Extra Time 4 with Pride of the Terraces

A prevalent theme for underrepresented communities in sport is that you can’t be what you can’t see. It is a refrain often repeated in women’s sport, football especially, but it is just as true for the LGBT+ community. It was particularly pleasing, therefore, to see such a prominence of articles across several media outlets for …

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Duncan Petrie: “We don’t like to call ourselves an LGBT+ team, we are an inclusive team, and anyone is welcome to join.”

Duncan Petrie had always wanted to play rugby, he just never saw the opportunity to actually go and do it. That is a perspective that many people within the LGBT+ community may relate to, but in Petrie's case it was as much to do with location as it was his sexuality. Growing up in Alford, …

Continue reading Duncan Petrie: “We don’t like to call ourselves an LGBT+ team, we are an inclusive team, and anyone is welcome to join.”

Kyle Yeats: “I know the club was a bit of a lifeline for me during the first lockdown, and I’m sure it has been for others too.”

As someone who was never particularly interested in sports growing up, the idea that Kyle Yeats would be doing PR for a rugby club never even came close to entering his mind. Holding the role of publicity officer at Aberdeen Taexali though, that is the exact situation that the 30-year-old finds himself in. Born and …

Continue reading Kyle Yeats: “I know the club was a bit of a lifeline for me during the first lockdown, and I’m sure it has been for others too.”

Cailum Lawson: “A lot of people just don’t think that gay people play sports. We do, and some of us are pretty damn good at it.”

Inclusive clubs are a place where people who have dropped out of sport can return in a welcoming environment. Equally, they can provide a chance for people who have never felt sport could be a place for them to take their first steps. For those who are well-versed in the sport of their choice though, …

Continue reading Cailum Lawson: “A lot of people just don’t think that gay people play sports. We do, and some of us are pretty damn good at it.”

Ruairidh Macdonald: “Everything that I had feared it was going to be was proven wrong.”

Growing up between Texas and Dubai, Ruairidh Macdonald had never come across an inclusive rugby club before coming home to Aberdeen for university. With the oil and gas industry sending his family around the world, Macdonald found himself far from the north east of Scotland, but he still managed to play rugby on the other …

Continue reading Ruairidh Macdonald: “Everything that I had feared it was going to be was proven wrong.”

Sam Winton: “If you say you don’t care about sexuality, you’re saying you don’t care about an important part of their life.”

Many LGBT+ youth struggle to find a place where they feel comfortable in sport. Sam Winton never turned against it, but there were certainly times where he felt like he was on the outside looking in when trying to take part. As the unsporty member of an active family, being in and around sport was …

Continue reading Sam Winton: “If you say you don’t care about sexuality, you’re saying you don’t care about an important part of their life.”

Ben Watkiss: “People are still maybe a bit fearful of crossing the line, so they just don’t address it at all.”

Examples of LGBT+ people working in men's professional football are few and far between. There are some as you go further down the tiers, with professional referee Ryan Atkin and eighth-tier side Ashford Town's manager Luke Tuffs just two vocal advocates, but between the 92 Premier League and Football League clubs it is extremely rare …

Continue reading Ben Watkiss: “People are still maybe a bit fearful of crossing the line, so they just don’t address it at all.”

Matt Hall: “I doubted myself, and I believed that I couldn’t go on.”

The Vancouver Winter Olympics in 2010 marked the first time that a Pride House was organised in conjunction with an international multi-sport event. Since then, it has become a regular part of major sporting events, with Pride Houses in place at the London Olympics in 2012, football's World Cup in Brazil in 2014, and the …

Continue reading Matt Hall: “I doubted myself, and I believed that I couldn’t go on.”

Ibrox Pride: “It has much more power than people will give it credit for, seeing people standing up.”

Rainbow Laces has given the sporting community – and football in particular – a chance to show their support for LGBT+ people. The message has by and large been one of acceptance and inclusion, with more high-profile messages and interviews being done by allies than ever before. Throughout the rest of the year, positive reinforcement …

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Rainbow Laces – Ross County: “We can’t keep hiding behind ‘that’s just what happens in football’, because every other walk of life has changed.”

Ross County pride themselves on being a club for their local community. Based in Dingwall, home to around 5500 people in the Highlands, having a team in the top flight of the Scottish leagues is a point of pride for the town. Often the lifeblood of the local area, the Staggies rely on their fanbase …

Continue reading Rainbow Laces – Ross County: “We can’t keep hiding behind ‘that’s just what happens in football’, because every other walk of life has changed.”